Want to Feel All Write? How Writing Heals and Creates Happiness

Chances are if you are on a soul development path you already keep a journal even if it’s just to keep track of your psychic development exercises or tarot readings. Journaling has long been recognised as a incredible self-help tool – no we’re not talking about Bridget Jones’s ramblings about how much she dislikes Mark Darcy and how many cigarettes, alcohol units or instants she’s been through in a day. A journal allows us to vent our thoughts and feelings on paper and also gives us the ability to go back and see how far we’ve progressed and how we solved problems. When we hit another speed bump, our journals can provide us with the reassurance we need – after all, if we solved our previous problems it just proves we can solve subsequent ones. Journals are therefore written landmarks we create on our soul journey. (And Bridget did after all come to realise Mark Darcy was the far better choice than love-rat Daniel Cleaver!).

Dr. Evelyn Lewin in Australia began to notice the benefits of writing down what was stressing her out rather than just slumping down on the couch in front of the TV after a 14-hour shift. She found that by writing an email to a friend, the tension would leave her body and she would sleep better. A colleague, psychologist Damien Adler of Mind Life Clinic in Victoria, Australia told her she’d merely stumbled on the therapeutic benefits of writing. Dr. Lewin had discovered that writing can actually improve your health.

“Often our thoughts swim around our head in a jumbled-up sort of way,” Adler explains. When putting them on paper we need to organise them. In the process, he says, you often discover your true feelings. “It basically forces you to think in a clearer way.” Writing also clears your mind, especially before bed. “The most common problem people have with sleep is having a busy brain,” explains Adler. This is actually our brain’s way of trying to look after us by aiming to remember everything. But at night we just want our brains to shut up so we can sleep. The solution, Adler says, is to outsource your brain’s job, by writing down your thoughts. “So the brain says, ‘I know that information is stored over there, so I don’t need to store that in my head.'” Which means your brain can relax.

Researchers from Stamford University also discovered writing can help you lose weight. They took 45 women and split them into two groups. Both groups were asked to write for 15 minutes a day. While one group was instructed to write about things they valued – such as music and friendships – the others were told to write about things that didn’t matter to them. Those who wrote about thing that were important to them were not only engaged in positive affirmations they were re-experiencing what made them feel good – and we all know when you feel good you’re less likely to turn to food for comfort. They lost weight while the women who just wrote about things that didn’t matter to them gained weight. Another study conducted by the American Psychological Association showed that teenagers who blogged or kept a journal had better self-esteem than those who didn’t.

Writing down your psychic insights can be a good way to chart your psychic development. Writing about your day releases tension and promotes gratitude, happiness and a healthy way of life as well as reinforcing goals. Remember, even if you don’t consider yourself a writer just write about what interests you – and nobody need see it except you. Turn your life write around today!

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